My Gorgeous African Hair and it’s Many Pains!

Soft, silky, warm and comfortable like cotton on its crown…

If only it wasn’t so hard to comb!

If you have been blessed and been born an African with pure African roots you will relate to my plight. There’s not anything as complicated and exhausting as trying to straighten out pure African Hair after washing it! Swimming in a sea of molasses with the hands and feet tied would be easier…believe me! You could almost comfortably say that African Hair is hydrophobic. no joking😰 The moment water touches it, trouble. Because then, it coils in on itself, shrinking further into something like gum that would require an army of tools to straighten out!

Most of you our comrades of the non fairer sex or even our non African friends may have always wondered why African girls seldom wear their hair natural, you know, just leave it and let it be, some fluent writers even went ahead and accused us of not being proud of our God given beauty that is, Pure African Hair…after all, what with the hiding and the fake extensions? Well, non of them know what it means to maintain African Hair. At least from my point of view.

Our dear concerned friends, we do not wear weaves, wigs, braids and whatever it is that we litter our crowns with, just for the sake. It’s all a camouflage, a way of survival or coping with the situation if you like. It’s so much easier that way than having to wash our hair and then worry about the excruciating pain that awaits at the salon just so as to straighten the hardened mesh out. That thing is extremely uncomfortable, the pain intolerable🙄. Yes, the end result is a gem, nothing feels softer to the touch… a wonder to behold, all in it’s shiny splendour, calling out to the senses like a strong drug. I could play with my natural hair all day but the thought of the ordeal later at the salon is tormenting.

There are known easier and more comfortable ways to help solve this puzzle, the thing however, is that, very few people are aware of them. I don’t know why such golden information isn’t up on all important billboards, because believe me, we need it. But since things are the way that they are,

Please let us enjoy our weaves and wigs and braids and whatever else there is, in peace, God knows we deserve it😊

Yours truly,

One African black girl💁🏿‍♀️❤️

11 thoughts on “My Gorgeous African Hair and it’s Many Pains!

  1. I first came to know about this ordeal in real sense when I read MALCOLM X biography. He described his painful experience of conk hairstyle (that’s what it is called I guess), a famous trend back then. I just want to let you know that you people are beautiful with all your heritage, your color, your hair and beautiful eyes.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow! And I thought I had a difficult time with my thick, naturally curly hair when I was young! (It has since thinned itself and is much easier – yay age!) I had absolutely no idea. Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I too am of African descent, blessed with hair of wool-like kinky texture with tight coils that favor shrinking than staying elongated. And because of its density and refusal to stay straight but to stick to its African kinkiness, it is indeed not a easy comb through. I too had a love-hate relationship with my hair and like you I did it all: greased it, pressed it, permed it and when those failed braided and weaved it. Finally I ended up with loving my hair just as it is and now wear it in its natural kinky form. Like you I also wrote a tribute to my hair. I’ve never put my posts on someone else’s blog but doing so now because our stories are so aligned: https://createdbydeesign.com/2021/02/20/ode-to-my-hair/
    (if you mind please delete, I won’t mind). In hair-sisterhood, Dee 🤗

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Awwwwww 🥰🥰🥰 how can I delete!
      Thank you for stopping by dear, and those points up there are so on point👌🏿
      Loved the ‘…refusal to stay straight but to stick to it’s African kinkiness’ That’s so beautifully written. And yes, it’s a Love-hate relationship certainly, which am still learning to cope up with🤣

      Cheers to hair-sisterhood🥂😘

      Runs off to check out your post on black girl hair plight🏃🏿‍♀️🥳

      Like

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